Learn something, heal your health

I love learning things about how the body works. And I live for online summits on this topic!  I learn valuable takeaways from each talk that have helped me advance my journey back to health.

The Immune Defense summit starts Monday July 24th! Lots of good speakers in here, including Izabella Wentz, Dr. Tom O’Bryan being among my favs.  

You bet your bottom I will be listening and taking notes!

If you want to listen along too, click here to check out the summit for yourself!

If you’re too busy, I will be listening to select talks and disseminating the information in future posts. 

Here’s to your health!

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Top ways I calm my ass down

I recently went to a new naturopath  and one of my concerns was my twitchy eye.  I wondered if it was a sign of adrenal fatigue.

She had me do a relaxation technique and lo and behold, the twitching just disappeared instantly.

The conclusion –  if a relaxation technique helps it go away, it’s stress related and not adrenal fatigue related.

I said “So in other words, I need to calm my ass down”. We laughed and then she said “Yes”.

HA!

Whether it’s managing a twitchy eyebrow, slowing down (or reversing!) an autoimmune disease, or stabilizing mast cells, I’m thoroughly convinced that calming my ass down has a profound impact on my health.

I am a spazz case.

I go from completely asleep to awake and in full body panic in 30 seconds flat.

The fight or flight response in my body goes off hundreds of times a day. It’s no wonder my body is attacking itself.

So through trial and error and many decades of spastic behavior, here are my top ways to calm my ass down (when I remember to do so DOH!):

  1.  Being present.

Mindfulness is becoming mainstream more than ever and it’s a good thing. Generally our anxieties are either about what happened or what’s about to happen.

In the present moment, RIGHT NOW, those things I worry about are not happening.  Everything is more or less fine RIGHT NOW. I’m alive, I’m here; those things really don’t exist here when I stop and think about it.

One of my greatest teachers of mindfulness (although he does not like the word) is Eckhart Tolle. If I’m REALLY having trouble being present because something seems so urgent or terrible or despairing, I like to find a YouTube video of one of Eckhart’s talks (and thankfully there are LOTS), and his truth speaks to my spirit and stillness sets in.

2.  Magnesium.

I take a specific blend of magnesium and taurate which is great for relaxing the muscles and body in general as well as being good for your heart.  I take this one:

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I really notice when I forget to take it.  My eye twitch comes back, and generally speaking I become more anxious.

I also have heart palpitations that make an appearance in the absence of this stuff.  It’s one of my must haves.

3.  Going outside.

I don’t know about you, but rarely has there been a day when going outside didn’t make it better.  Especially when I’m stressed out and too “in my head”.

Getting in tune with nature and the magnitude of it all helps to put things in perspective.  And the fresh air helps clear my head and probably my body too.

If I’m in the middle of turmoil (whether real or inflated), going for a walk helps reset my attitude so that I can better deal with what is happening.

Going for a walk while listening to Eckhart is even better!

 

 

 

How I used Al Anon to help me heal from Hashimotos

Part of my journey to Hashimotos came from the culmination of several forces in my life.

One of the trigger events I believe was a nervous breakdown that exemplified the amount of emotional stress I was carrying around with me.  And this emotional stress largely came from growing up in a disfunctional home (which I later came to know was an alcoholic environment).

There were no brawls or drunken fights but there were lots of unspoken rules which I carried on to my adult life and they wreaked havoc on every part of my being.

You don’t get an autoimmune disease overnight. Yes, there are a lot of factors involved – genetics, gut health, trigger events.  But emotional turmoil can easily affect the development of such a thing.

Luckily, after my nervous breakdown and way before I was diagnosed with Hashimotos, I found Al Anon. And through it, I acquired many tools that taught me the meaning of sanity and emotional equilibrium.

Today I will share with you the things Al Anon taught me that helped me manage and reverse Hashimotos.

1. ODAT – One Day at a Time.

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I don’t know about you but a large part of my anxiety and emotional turmoil came from stressing about the future or the past.

Trying to plan out events or micromanage things that were out of my co trial left me a nervous wreck.  Obviously. Because things never turned out how I “planned” them.

Learning to live one day at a time, or in the beginning – one minute, one second at a time, was challenging but became easier with practice.  And my anxiety level decreased greatly.

In turn, my immune system had a chance to rest because it didn’t get the signal to “fight or flight” constantly.

A tested immune system is a more balanced immune system, hopefully one that does not attack its own tissue.

2 – Focus on yourself.

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In my adult life, I had gotten into the bad habit of running around like a chicken with my head cut off, trying to manage everyone’s problems while neglecting myself.

Oh there was martyrdom galore!

Lots of feeling sorry for myself.

One of the things Al Anon taught me was to keep the focus on myself.  Instead of trying to manage someone else’s life (most likely when they would prefer that I butt out!), I can instead turn the focus inward and ask myself if there is anything I need.

Am I hungry? Lonely? Tired?

I can instead take care of my own needs and make sure my well being is taken care of.

My immune system appreciates not being run ragged and self care always feels nice.  I eat better, am more rested, and am happier overall.

3 – Attitude of Gratitude.

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It is very easy to get down in the dumps for me when I don’t feel well.

The worse I feel physically, the worse I feel emotionally.  And it becomes kind of a self perpetuating cycle.

When my hair was falling out and the fatigue made me feel 60 instead of 30, I was not a very positive person.

One of the things Al Anon teaches us is to look for the silver lining in each situation, even the most seemingly hopeless.

The trouble with the pit of despair (at least for me!) is that once I’m in it, it’s really hard to claw my way out. If I catch myself getting down and starting the downward spiral, I can MAKE myself practice gratitude and stop the descent.

It’s definitely counterintuitive and not something I WANT to do in that moment. But I ALWAYS feel better afterwards and magically the spiral has dissipated.

If you yourself are suffering from a high load of emotional stress, it is crucial to get a handle on it to begin your road to recovery from Hashimotos (or ANY autoimmune disease).  Al Anon is a tool that is available to everyone, whether they grew up in an alcoholic home or just a very disfunctional one.  You can find a local chapter here:

http://al-anon.org/find-a-meeting

I wish you luck on your journey to wellness and happiness!